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Archive for September, 2016

Getting started with ESP8266 | AT Commands

September 26th, 2016 No comments

Connecting the ESP8266 Wi-Fi module to PC and trying out some AT Commands.The ESP8266 is a low-cost Wi-Fi chip with full TCP/IP stack and microcontroller capability produced by Shanghai-based Chinese manufacturer, Espressif Systems.

The chip first came to the attention of western makers in August 2014 with the ESP-01 module, made by a third-party manufacturer, AI-Thinker. This small module allows microcontrollers to connect to a Wi-Fi network and make simple TCP/IP connections using Hayes-style commands. However, at the time there was almost no English-language documentation on the chip and the commands it accepted.The very low price and the fact that there were very few external components on the module which suggests that it could eventually be very inexpensive in volume, attracted many hackers to explore the module, chip, and the software on it, as well as to translate the Chinese documentation.

The ESP8285 is an ESP8266 with 1 MB of built-in flash, allowing for single-chip devices capable of connecting to Wi-Fi.

Source : WikiPedia (bit.ly/2cORmj0)
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Links :
Sparkfun AT Guide : bit.ly/2cEzSbv
Connection Diagram : bit.ly/2cxoTCw
Buy : amzn.to/2cZfUv8

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Getting Started with Smallest Arduino | Digispark AtTiny85

September 22nd, 2016 No comments

The Digispark is an Attiny85 based microcontroller development board similar to the Arduino line, only cheaper, smaller, and a bit less powerful. With a whole host of shields to extend its functionality and the ability to use the familiar Arduino IDE the Digispark is a great way to jump into electronics, or perfect for when an Arduino is too big or too much.

Specs:
Support for the Arduino IDE 1.0+ (OSX/Win/Linux)
Power via USB or External Source – 5v or 7-35v (12v or less recommended, automatic selection)
On-board 500ma 5V Regulator
Built-in USB
6 I/O Pins (2 are used for USB only if your program actively communicates over USB, otherwise you can use all                                    6 even if you are programming via USB)
8k Flash Memory (about 6k after bootloader)
I2C and SPI (vis USI)
PWM on 3 pins (more possible with Software PWM)
ADC on 4 pins
Power LED and Test/Status LED

In this video you will find a detailed description of the smallest Arduino compatible board like how to configure your Arduino IDE in order to program this board.

Links :
Drivers : goo.gl/wvoxcW
Board URL : digistump.com/package_digistum…
Buy : goo.gl/5UNrH6

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MCP3208 I2C ADC Interfacing with Arduino

September 21st, 2016 1 comment

The MCP3208 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) combines high performance and low power consumption in a small package, making it ideal for embedded control applications. IC features a successive approximation register (SAR) architecture and an industry-standard SPI™ serial interface, allowing 12-bit ADC capability to be added to any PICmicro® microcontroller.  IC Features 100k samples/second, 8 input channels, low power consumption (5nA typical standby, 400 µA max.active), and is available in 16-pin PDIP and SOIC packages. Applications for the IC include data acquisition, instrumentation and measurement, multi-channel data loggers, industrial PCs, motor control, robotics, industrial automation, smart sensors, portable instrumentation and home medical appliances.

Source : Microchip(bit.ly/2dmncHs)


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Links:
Arduino Schematic : goo.gl/YwFy9z
SPI Data packets: goo.gl/r8izQz
Sketch: goo.gl/AyK9ey

Datasheet: goo.gl/EnMNbI
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Raspberry Pi 3 as BLE Beacon

September 21st, 2016 No comments

               Bluetooth beacons are hardware transmitters – a class of Bluetooth low energy (LE) devices that broadcast their identifier to nearby portable electronic devices. The technology enables smartphones, tablets and other devices to perform actions when in close proximity to a beacon. The first commercial implementation of bluetooth beacons was by an Australian company called DKTOB (trading as Daelibs), who leveraged Bluetooth for indoor proximity sensing in its Seeknfind location attendance solution. Daelibs designed and manufactured a bluetooth beacon for use in shopping centres based on the Bluegiga chipset. In 2012 Daelibs filed its Bluetooth beacon patent. Bluetooth beacons uses Bluetooth low energy proximity sensing to transmit a universally unique identifier picked up by a compatible app or operating system. The identifier and several bytes sent with it can be used to determine the device’s physical location,[4] track customers, or trigger a location-based action on the device such as a check-in on social media or a push notification. One application is distributing messages at a specific Point of Interest, for example a store, a bus stop, a room or a more specific location like a piece of furniture or a vending machine. This is similar to previously used geopush technology based on GPS, but with a much reduced impact on battery life and much extended precision.

Another application is an indoor positioning system,which helps smartphones determine their approximate location or context. With the help of a Bluetooth beacon, a smartphone’s software can approximately find its relative location to a Bluetooth Beacon in a store. Brick and mortar retail stores use the beacons for mobile commerce, offering customers special deals through mobile marketing,[8] and can enable mobile payments through point of sale systems.Bluetooth beacons differs from some other location-based technologies as the broadcasting device (beacon) is only a 1-way transmitter to the receiving smartphone or receiving device, and necessitates a specific app installed on the device to interact with the beacons. This ensures that only the installed app (not the Bluetooth beacon transmitter) can track users, potentially against their will, as they passively walk around the transmitters. Bluetooth beacon transmitters come in a variety of form factors, including small coin cell devices, USB sticks, and generic Bluetooth 4.0 capable USB dongles.

Source: WikiPedia (bit.ly/2dvLZKn)

You can use your Raspberry Pi laying around as BLE Beacon.
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Links:
Beacon URL Calculator : goo.gl/QVaguX
About BLE :goo.gl/KpAmlF

Raspberry Pi 3 : goo.gl/Oa8KKu
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Support me to keep going.

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MCP3208 I2C ADC Interfacing with Raspberry Pi

September 21st, 2016 No comments

The MCP3208 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) combines high performance and low power consumption in a small package, making it ideal for embedded control applications. IC features a successive approximation register (SAR) architecture and an industry-standard SPI™ serial interface, allowing 12-bit ADC capability to be added to any PICmicro® microcontroller.  IC Features 100k samples/second, 8 input channels, low power consumption (5nA typical standby, 400 µA max.active), and is available in 16-pin PDIP and SOIC packages. Applications for the IC include data acquisition, instrumentation and measurement, multi-channel data loggers, industrial PCs, motor control, robotics, industrial automation, smart sensors, portable instrumentation and home medical appliances.

Source : Microchip(bit.ly/2dmncHs)

This video is all about connecting MCP3208 with Raspberry Pi and accessing it using JAVA.

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Repository : goo.gl/7NRe5n

Schematic : goo.gl/kbkhj4

Code : goo.gl/J0BT8p

Compiled JAVA App: goo.gl/pvb6Sp

Lib :  https://goo.gl/NyI9vL

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DHT11 | Interface using JAVA | Raspberry Pi

September 1st, 2016 No comments

The DHT11 is a basic, ultra low-cost digital temperature and humidity sensor. It uses a capacitive humidity sensor and a thermistor to measure the surrounding air, and spits out a digital signal on the data pin (no analog input pins needed). Its fairly simple to use, but requires careful timing to grab data. The only real downside of this sensor is you can only get new data from it once every 2 seconds, so when using our library, sensor readings can be up to 2 seconds old.

Source : Adafruit (bit.ly/2dgEt3f)